What can Hugh Hefner teach us about Community Management?

Description

Managing a community is like hosting a great party. Every day I plan, promote, set things up, greet guests, make introductions, serve meaningful tidbits, address guest questions and make sure that everyone is comfortable and engaged. Just like getting ready for a great party I do my research, pick a theme, make a guest list and send out invitations. Some people think that a great party is all about location, decoration, food and music, but that is just some of the ingredients that go into setting the scene (infrastructure). All of my great party memories are about the people I met, the conversations I had, things that I’ve learned and the connections that I’ve made. Great people make a good party amazing. All of these things are true about building a great online community. My focus is teach people how to parallel program on multi-core chips, but in order to make it work they need to engage and excited about the whole experience.

Aaron Tersteeg

Affiliation Community Manager at Intel Software Network - Multi-Core Community
Website http://software.intel.com/en-us/blogs/author/madacterste/
Biography

Constant learner, enthusiastic teacher…skier, cyclist, chef, fly caster, volunteer, Orangeman, investor, media junkie and beer drinking party guy. Drop me a line at: aaron.c.tersteeg at the domain intel.com. I launched the mobile software development community in the summer of 2006 and am now the community manager for Threading for Multi-Core. In my current role my focus is software development evangelist and geek blogger. Started as a mechanical engineer (oil pump design didn’t do it for me), moved on to Information Resource Management, worked as a Business Process Consultant, Fortune 500 Webmaster, Web Application Development VP of Sales and Marketing, Data Center Product Management and now Software Development. My wife likes to tell people at parties that I blog for a living. It is much more than that but it lets me share my ideas and hear what developers have to say.